Tag Archives: Geoffrey Canada

Princess Mary of Denmark visits Harlem Children’s Zone Promise Academy

According to Hello Magazine, royalty paid a visit to Harlem recently.  The People-like magazine of Britain reports that Princess Mary of Denmark “helped out students at Harlem Children’s Zone Promise Academy II with one of their classes.”  Apparently, this all came down yesterday. Click here to read the full story and here for more photos!

Harlem Children’s Zone launches twitter site on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

Mar 24, 2011 @ 23:26
By HarlemGal
Did any of you watch Late Night with Jimmy Fallon this past Tuesday night? Fallon interviewed Geoffrey Canada, Harlem Children’s Zone CEO, on the obvious and most important topic, education! Fallon praised Canada for his dedication to helping children in Harlem receive an education and told him “he is so cool.” After discussing the importance of education, not only in Harlem but across the US, Canada announced that he was joining the masses and starting a twitter site. It’s called @hczorg. In just two days, the Harlem Children’s Zone has more than 2500 followers. Not bad and definitely cool!

Harlem student and well-known educator featured in ‘Waiting for Superman’

Sep 21, 2010 @ 6:55

By HarlemGal
There are plenty of films that open every weekend in New York City. There are so many that it is hard to decide what to see in the movie theaters at times. However, this weekend is different. There is only one film to see and that’s “Waiting for Superman,” which opens in the Big Apple on September 24. “Waiting for Superman” is a new documentary by Davis Guggenheim, Academy Award-winning director of “An Inconvenient Truth,” that covers our public education system and it features individuals  from or connected to Harlem.

In the film, Guggenheim’s cameras follow Bianca, who is now a second grader, lives in Harlem with her mother Nakia and is trying to get into a charter school. Geoffrey Canada, CEO of the Harlem’s Children Zone, is also featured in the film as well as the charter school he founded right here in Central Harlem. And last, the film’s title came from Canada. “The title refers to a Harlem educator’s childhood belief that a superhero would fix the problems of the ghetto.”

According to some reviews, the film is expected to rattle some boots, i.e. charter vs. no charter schools, and potentially start a revolution about public education. For me, anything that provokes some rattle and a little bit of revolution about a topic and situation that affects us all, I am so there. I can’t wait to see “Waiting for Superman” in theaters this weekend. Join me?